Monday, December 6, 2010

PUSH Novel Contest

Again, I'm a horrible blogger. My posts are becoming more and more erratic by the month. I don't have time for a real post today, what with college apps and homework, but I just thought I'd share a short article about the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards Novel Contest:

Article

As you might've noticed, me and my book are mentioned at the end of the article. Hope you enjoy, and if you know any young novelists out there tell them to google Alliance for Young Artists and Writers.

27 comments:

  1. Hi. I googled information about the contest and this blog came up. So I'm wondering if you could answer some questions.


    1) What font did you use? What size pt? (I'm getting very paranoid here, yes I know :))

    2) Does the manuscript need to be stapled? (Did you staple your manuscript?)

    3) When did you submit your manuscript?

    4) When the guidelines ask for a synopsis / outline, do they mean a summary of every chapter or just a basic overview of the whole novel?

    Thank you so much.

    -Daniel Frotrsky

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  2. Hi Daniel,

    I used Times New Roman 12-point font with 1 inch margins all around. 50 pages is a lot to staple...I'm pretty sure I used a paper clip to hold it together, but I doubt it matters either way. Just make sure the pages are numbered. Last year the deadline for novels was March 12, and I sent mine on March 10 (I completely forgot until the very last minute). I believe the deadline this year is sometime in February, so just make sure it arrives in New York before the cutoff. The synopsis is just a basic overview (mine ended up at two pages double spaced). I did mine in paragraph format, sort of like a lengthened version of the synopsis on the back of a book. Just make sure to summarize the climax and resolution of the story (in other words, don't make it a cliff-hanger - tell the judges how it ends).

    Hope this helps!

    :)

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  3. Kate,

    Thank you so much. I wish you the best of luck in all your writing endeavors (even though you won't need it).

    -Daniel

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  4. Thank you for blogging. Seriously. It gives me so much more confidence to see other young writers succeed in a brutal, adult world. This year, I discovered the Scholastic Art and Writing Alliance and your blog through it. I am going to submit my third story next month. Reading your blog--and your inevitable success story--gives me much more hope about my future as a writer. So thank you, and I can't wait to read your books.

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  5. Maya - Thanks so much for your kind words!! It's really great to know there are other young writers out there. The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards is a fantastic opportunity, especially considering how aspiring writers are often overlooked in the school system. Good luck with your stories!!!

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  6. Do you have any advice/tips for writers entering the contest?

    thanks(:

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  7. Hi Anonymous,

    For entering the novel contest, make sure you follow all the submission guidelines. It may seem like a no-brainer but you'd be surprised how many people don't bother to read them carefully. Also, revise, revise, revise!!! Go over the first 50 pages several times and have somebody else read them as well. Make sure the story starts on page 1, not page 20, and run your submission through a grammar/spell check before sending.

    Good luck!!!

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  8. Thank you(:

    I'm just really nervous. I hope my story will be good enough.

    Do you know if your novel will be published yet?

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  9. Oh don't be nervous! Writing is such a subjective thing, so even if you don't win that doesn't mean your story isn't good enough to be published. Everybody has different tastes, including the judges.

    As for publication, I won't know until next summer when I do my internship at Scholastic, but I'm keeping my fingers crossed!

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  10. Thinking about it that way really helps, especially since some religion is in my story. Now if I lose, it won't seem as bad, so thank you!

    Well I hope they publish it for you! I'd love to read it some day. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you also, haha.

    Thanks for all the great advice, it really helped me and goodluck on all your future goals.

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  11. i had a question; if you win the contest and they decide to publish your book, do they have to wait until you turn 18 to publish it?

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  12. Hi Dave,

    No, you do not have to wait until you are eighteen. If you are a minor that just means your parents have to sign the contract along with you.

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  13. is there an amount of time you have to spend as an intern, or just until you finish the manuscript?

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  14. The internship lasts for one month, but I know at least one winner who went two summers in a row in order to finish editing.

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  15. Kate,

    You said that you chose to do the internship for this summer. Could you have done it last summer? (the summer that you won the contest)

    Thanks a lot,
    Lizzi

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  16. Um I don't think so. I suppose I could've asked, but my editor didn't even bring up the internship until recently. I'm pretty sure Scholastic likes to plan for the internship at least a few months in advance.

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  17. Why were there two winners last year?

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  18. Hi Karen,

    Scholastic chooses winners for the novel contest solely based on the quality of submissions. In 2009 they didn't pick a gold medalist because none of the submissions met their standards. In 2010, the year I won, they had a lot of wonderful submissions so they decided to have two winners.

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  19. Well, that makes sense. Thanks!

    Also, do you have any examples of what type of outline they are looking for? At this point, I'm just not sure what to include in it.

    Thank you so much.

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  20. No problem :)

    Yeah, outlines can be hard...mine was two pages double-spaced. Start with a hook paragraph that lays out the current situation and what makes your novel unique. From there go into more detail, and do some paragraphs describing major plot points. Make sure to include how the story ends.

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  21. Wow, that really helped me! Thank you! :D

    And do we have to title our chapters? Because I looked at the requirements and I didn't see that on there...and I know some books do and others don't, so I was just wondering.

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  22. No problem. And my chapters don't have titles, so you should be fine without them.

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  23. Ms. Coursey,

    How many chapters did you submit to the contest? Does it matter how long/short the chapters are?

    Thanks for your time,

    James

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  24. Hi James,

    I submitted five chapters. It doesn't matter how long they are, but if your first five chapters only add up to twenty or thirty pages, you might want to combine a few so you get closer to the fifty page limit. I was lucky in that my first five chapters added up to exactly 48 pages.

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  25. For the outline, did you go into depth on everything? I've tried to and my outline ended up being four pages long.

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  26. James,

    You definitely need to be selective in terms of what you include in the outline. Pick your favorite parts of the book and summarize them, but don't include too much detail. Read through your outline and try to identify sentences you can cut entirely.

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